Current Issue
Organiser Home
Editorial
EXPOSE
Reports
Comment
The Moving Finger Writes
Media Watch
Thinking Aloud
Bookmark
A PAGE FROM HISTORY
RETROSPECT
Kids Org.
News Round-up
Readers’ Forum:
INTERESTING PEOPLE
PERSPECTIVE
Kerala Newsletter

Previous Issues
September 04, 2011

August 28, 2011
August 21, 2011
August 14, 2011
August 07, 2011

July 31, 2011
July 24, 2011
July 17, 2011
July 10, 2011
July 03, 2011

June 26, 2011
June 19, 2011
June 12, 2011
June 05, 2011

May 29, 2011
May 22, 2011
May 15, 2011
May 08, 2011
May 01, 2011

April 24, 2011
April 17, 2011
April 10, 2011
April 03, 2011

March 27, 2011
March 20, 2011
March 13, 2011
March 06, 2011

February 27, 2011
February 20, 2011
February 13, 2011
February 06, 2011

January 30, 2011
January 23, 2011
January 16, 2011
January 09, 2011
January 02, 2011

December 26, 2010
December 19, 2010
December 12, 2010
December 05, 2010
November 28, 2010
November 21, 2010
November 14, 2010
November 7, 2010

October 31, 2010
October 24, 2010
October 17, 2010
October 10, 2010
October 03, 2010

2010 Issues
2009 Issues
2008 Issues
2007 Issues
2006 Issues

Organiser
About us
Advertisement
Circulation
Contact us

Subscribe


January 09, 2011




Page: 28/46

Home > 2011 Issues > January 09, 2010

Contemporary Pakistani literature reflects a nation troubled
By Dr Vaidehi Nathan

Granta Pakistan, Granta, Pp 256 (PB), Rs £12.99/-

FAMOUS writer Kamala Das had once remarked that the best literary works, (she emphasized on poems) come out of conflict. That must be true of Pakistan. Living in constant intra and international squabbles, the Pakistanis have not known much of peace. The Granta issue on Pakistan has to be viewed in this light, with that sympathy.

The writers chosen for the issue largely fall in three categories - those who are living outside Pakistan - Daniyal Mueenuddin, Kamila Shamsie and Nadeem Aslam, those who have gone back - Mohsin Hamid and Mohammed Hanif and those living there. The last have been writing in Urdu, Punjabi, Sindhi, Baluchi and English.

Kamila Shamsie, an author, talks about the growing up years in Pakistan, in Karachi, about the music the adolescents loved, about the curtailed free movement because of the constant fear that ‘something will happen’ and the way the youth adapted to the scenario. Fatima Bhutto, author and granddaughter of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, talks about her quest-travel- for the Mangho Pir.

The short and sweet poem by Hasina Gul, a broadcaster with Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation reads like this: We grow up/ but do not comprehend life./ We think life is just the passing of time./ The fact is,/ life is one thing,/ and time something else.

Predictably there is a piece on Kashmir, by Basharat Peer, author and fellow at Open Society Institute, New York.

Interspersed with illustrations - paintings, posters, - the book offers a comprehensive peep into the literary world of our western neighbour. The subtle works suggest a society that is grappling with its malaise. Politics is absent, but for a ‘portrait’ of Jinnah.

(Granta, 12, Addison Avenue, London W11 4QR,)




Previous Page Previous Page (27/46) - Next Page (29/46) Next Page


copyright© 2004 Bharat Prakashan(Delhi) Ltd. All Rights Reserved
Designed and Hosted by KSHEERAJA Web Solutions Pvt Ltd