Current Issue
Organiser Home
Editorial
EXPOSE
Reports
Comment
The Moving Finger Writes
Media Watch
Thinking Aloud
Bookmark
A PAGE FROM HISTORY
RETROSPECT
Kids Org.
News Round-up
Readers’ Forum:
INTERESTING PEOPLE
PERSPECTIVE
Kerala Newsletter

Previous Issues
September 04, 2011

August 28, 2011
August 21, 2011
August 14, 2011
August 07, 2011

July 31, 2011
July 24, 2011
July 17, 2011
July 10, 2011
July 03, 2011

June 26, 2011
June 19, 2011
June 12, 2011
June 05, 2011

May 29, 2011
May 22, 2011
May 15, 2011
May 08, 2011
May 01, 2011

April 24, 2011
April 17, 2011
April 10, 2011
April 03, 2011

March 27, 2011
March 20, 2011
March 13, 2011
March 06, 2011

February 27, 2011
February 20, 2011
February 13, 2011
February 06, 2011

January 30, 2011
January 23, 2011
January 16, 2011
January 09, 2011
January 02, 2011

December 26, 2010
December 19, 2010
December 12, 2010
December 05, 2010
November 28, 2010
November 21, 2010
November 14, 2010
November 7, 2010

October 31, 2010
October 24, 2010
October 17, 2010
October 10, 2010
October 03, 2010

2010 Issues
2009 Issues
2008 Issues
2007 Issues
2006 Issues

Organiser
About us
Advertisement
Circulation
Contact us

Subscribe


June 26, 2011




Page: 23/32

Home > 2011 Issues > June 26, 2011

Kids’ Org
Kali and Nala

By KK Shanmukhan

WHEN the gods were returning after attending the wedding of Nala with Damayanti, they met Kali, the most dangerous of demons and Dwapara, his friend on their way. Indra asked: “Oh, Kali, where are you to?”

Kali: “Gods, have mercy, we are going to wed Damayanti.”

The gods laughed at them scornfully and told:“You are searching for a cage long after the bird has flown off. She has married Nala, a gentle king. We have also participated in the marriage and are back.”

To this Kali replied scornfully: “Wonderful. In your presence she wedded a human being. Love-thirsty, you were looking helplessly, swallowing your saliva. No shame. Now you behold. We shall separate them and do havoc in their life.” Having said this Kali roared a thunderous laugh.

Indra warned him: “Look Kali, Nala is a great hero and to play tricks with him will not do well to you. Be careful.” Thus warning them, the gods departed. Kali and Dwapara straight went to Pushkara a dejected and depressed cousin of Nala. Hearing the footsteps, Pushkara asked: “Who is there? Come closer and tell me, what do you want? These days no one comes to me. All go in search of Nala. He is the king. I have no power now.”

“No, Pushkara, don’t say that. You should have been the king. No matter. We will make you. And let us tell you I am the all potent Kali and he is Dwapara my friend. Have courage and challenge Nala who is enjoying your rights also. Challenge him for a battle of dice. Rest of the things you leave to us.

Encouraged by Kali and Dwapara, Pushkara challenged Nala for a dice combat. Though Damayanti prevented him, Nala did not give heed.

In the game of dice Nala was miserably defeated. Pushkara became king. He ordered Nala and Damayanti to leave the country and go to the forest.

Nala and Damayanti wandered in the forest without food and safety. Kali, was following them trying to enter into Nala. It took a long time for Kali to attack and enslave him.

Under the influence of Kali, Nala lost his own self and started behaving strangely.

One night as Damayanti was sleeping hungry and fatigued, keeping her head on Nala’s lap, Nala lifted her head slowly and put it down. He thought there would be no escape for both of them until they are together. He prayed God to protect her and with a heavy heart, cut half of her cloth and left her in the forest alone. He escaped from her without a particular design or destination.

Damayanti, when got up from her nap, did not see Nala around. She thought he was hiding somewhere nearby to make jest. Finding alone in the dense forest for some time, she began to shout for him and having no result started crying. There was no use. She still wandered aimlessly.

She fell down tired. Sleep, thirst, hunger, anxiety and fear overcame her. She fell into a short swoon. A senstation and pain on her leg which felt her leg very heavy woke her up. She knew that a python was slowly swallowing her leg. She started crying aloud.

A hunter who was preparing to go for hunting heard this sweet crying voice and he assumed that it should be a lady who was in danger.

When he reached the spot, to his utter surprise he found a beautiful lady alone. Her leg was half swallowed by a python. In the first look itself he could assume that she did not belong to the tribal community or anywhere around that area.

He addressed her: “Do not lament, Oh lady matchlessly beautiful. I shall instantly kill the python.” Then he took his sword out and cut the snake into pieces.

Damayanti got relieved. Addressing the hunter she said: “Friend, thank you. I am indebted to you. I don’t have anything valuable to reward you suitably for this favour.”

But the hunter was reluctant to go.

The hunter began to approach her with amorous gestures. She requested him not to trouble her and leave her alone. But he was stubborn and determined.

Damayanti remembered the boon that Indra had conferred on her that anyone who tried to dishonour her would instantly perish. Unwillingly though, she had to apply hat boon. The movement she recalled that boon, the hunter fell dead.

She travelled many miles and on the way met with a team of merchants. The leader of the team happened to observe her dirty clothing and tired personality. But he could also distinguish that she should be of some noble birth. He approached her and inquired about her.

She told him that she was the niece of the queen of Chedi and that she was going there. The chief of the merchant gave her food and new clothing and took her to Chedi and entrusted her to her aunt.

The queen understood her story in detail and finally sent her to her father at Kundina.

King Bhima had been so restless that there was no place for him to trace for her. When, however his daughter reached home he was happy. He sent many servants to different destinations in search of Nala.

(To be continued)

Courtesy: Nala and Damayanti for students




Previous Page Previous Page (22/32) - Next Page (24/32) Next Page


copyright© 2004 Bharat Prakashan(Delhi) Ltd. All Rights Reserved
Designed and Hosted by KSHEERAJA Web Solutions Pvt Ltd